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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
military training environment. i look forward to your questions after general welsh's remarks. thank you. >> i completely agree that the b.m.t. investigations don't mark the end of anything. the air force has recommitted itself that every airman is treated with respect. it's a way of life. this has been stunning to most of us in the air force. there is simply no excuse for us or no justifiable exexplanation and there is no way we can allow this to happen again. the goal is not to lower the number. the goal is zero. it's the only acceptable objective. the impact on every victim, their family and friend and the other people in their unit is heart wrenching. we are giving this our full attention. out of the 46 recommendations, 23 are fully implemented, 22 more will be implemented by november of this year and the final has been separated and has to do with short tng length of basic military training itself and that's being reviewed. some of these recommendations have appability to the entire air force and we're working into building them into the program into our air force leadership trainin
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
faced by all american officials operating overseas, how to remain active in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of s
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot about the campaign -- during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the president's message was the economy. >> the last question beca
to that environment. i have to believe that the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. host: from yesterday's news conference at the pentagon, and our entire programming is on c- span.org -- we welcome our radio listeners as well. there was this from robert -- this was based on the clip we just showed you, from the army officer from the marine corps. we will go to robert from north carolina, a democrat. caller: i am a combat veteran of korea and vietnam. i will cut it short. they were talking about the all volunteer army. there were trying to get women into the ranks. my sister -- [indiscernible] one thing i found out, what we went through in vietnam and korea, it was for men and went -- and men only. yes, they served in different areas such as the medical field, but in combat, no. host: ok, thank you for the call. the story inside the new york times -- there are similar stories around the country. -- a couple of points -- back to your calls. jesse in muskegon, michigan. good morning. caller: good morning. can you hear me? host: yes. caller: i have a
. there should never, ever be a question about health and the safety and the environment that we put our men and women and their families in when we ask them to make sacrifices to serve this country, and i am committed to do that, and we will have further conversations. >> i know you have answered a number of questions about israel already today, but i do have one i want to ask you also. there is a special and historic bond between the u.s. and israel. and i am personally committed to israel's security and identity as a jewish state. when we met earlier i was pleased to hear you agree and also support a two-state solution and oppose any unilateral declaration of a palestinian state. we also discussed the need for a strong military and intelligence engagement between the u.s. and israel. >> just last fall i was in israel and i have spoken with senior military officials from both countries and i have continually heard the ties between our military and our intelligence organization has never been stronger. if confirmed, do you intend to maintain this close relationship and do you have any idea
are but a manifestation of the brilliance of nature to enable us to adapt to the environment in which we evolved, that somehow these characteristics determine our inate worth and value as human beings. that is the essence of racism. but that system was not cultivated into every intellectual commercial, judicial, religious philosophical medical system that we have. the imbalances you see in the country today -- i call them inequities' -- are but reflections of that deep-seated belief. is it a conscious in most of us? no. in some of us, ys. -- yes. i aniston the ku klux klan -- i understand the ku klux klan was going to have a rally. some people consciously adhere to that belief. but most of us have been swept up in it and we do not even know wit. it is easy to be at the top and never have to think about it. it is impossible to be on the bottom and not think about that on a daily basis and not internalize the absurdity of the devaluation of your humanity on a daily basis. my lovely daughter once said to me, "how did the story of african-americans get inverted into a story of victimization only?" "
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)